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Insulin Resistance and Cardiovascular Disease

Big Pharma and Diabetes

There is no doubt about it that millions of dollars are spent on marketing and advertising by the prescription drug companies.  Most consumers associate heart disease which includes heart attacks and strokes with high cholesterol levels. Statins (medications that reduced cholesterol) have proved to be one of the most profitable drugs being used by the drug industry.  It was reported that one pharmaceutical company reported billions of dollars in sales coming from these types of medicines in one year alone. Is there more to cardiovascular disease than cholesterol?  Many researchers believe that high cholesterol is a symptom of other problems the body is trying to remedy.

One significant threat regarding heart disease that many people fail to notice is insulin resistance. Research is showing that insulin resistance is playing a major role in cardiovascular disease. Unfortunately, many are unaware of the danger of insulin resistance and its association with heart disease. Investigators are presently researching the link in between these 2 conditions and looking for means to reduce the threat.

Diabetes and Heart Disease

Diabetes SignHere are some interesting facts about cardiovascular disease and diabetes:

The 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease are closely related.   Sadly, diabetics who don’t have heart disease have the same risk for a heart attack as non-diabetics who have heart problems.

Insulin resistance and inflammation can be decreased without the use of prescription medications that can have harmful side effects.

Some healthy supplements that are known to decrease insulin resistance include fish oil, white bean extract, chromium, vitamin D, Lipoic acid, DHEA, resveratrol, magnesium, beta glucans, apples, cinnamon, polyphenols, and environment-friendly tea.

The majority of individuals that have cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus are generally insulin-resistant.  Being insulin resistant results in raised blood sugar, high triglyceride levels, lower good cholesterol, increased swelling, and an increased risk associated with diabetic issues, cardiac arrest as well as stroke.

Metabolic Syndrome and Heart Disease

Ralphie MayMedical textbooks started describing labeling a condition called Metabolic Syndrome around 1998.  This is not a disease but it is a condition that affects over 47 million Americans.  To be described as having metabolic syndrome a person must meet 3 of the five factors that are involved.  These factors are triglyceride levels above 150 milligrams per deciliter, high blood pressure, high bad cholesterol levels, high blood sugar levels and fat accumulating in the abdominal region.

Being diagnosed with Metabolic Syndrome doubles your risk for heart attacks and strokes and increases the likelihood of diabetes by a factor of 5.

The First step in defending against metabolic disorder is to gauge your possible risk.  Checking insulin resistance with simple blood tests and measuring cholesterol, insulin, triglycerides, CRP and DHEA.

Metabolic syndrome is acknowledged by different names – insulin resistance syndrome, syndrome X, borderline diabetes mellitus.  It is commonly related to enhanced inflammation in addition to a three-fold or higher risk for heart stroke, diabetes, and also attack.

Metabolic Syndrome – Also Known As Insulin Resistance

heart attackMetabolic disorder is shown to increase atherosclerotic plaque, increase bad cholesterol and increase inflammation.  Even with great cholesterol levels, people who have metabolic disorder can have concealed atherosclerotic plaquing within the body.

If you are worried about having blood sugar issues see your health care professional and tell them about your concerns. No one cares about your own health more than you!  Do your own research to find out exactly what test is the best fit for you.  Consult your doctor regarding your findings.  If your medical professional is unwilling to cooperate, it may be time to find another health care provider

Be aware that the more weight you gain the more your chances of metabolic syndrome increase. Dropping weight and eating healthy is a simple step we all can take to improve our health and wellbeing.

The more sugar you eat, the more you may weigh. Most studies have linked sugar with type-2 diabetes and obesity, thanks to the loads of empty calories it contributes to.

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